glass pane on left to start toolbar small icon of a lit candle Home small icon of an unlit candle Church small icon of an unlit candle Parish Information small icon of an unlit candle Photogallery small icon of an unlit candle Webcam small icon of an unlit candle History glass pane on right to start toolbar

Schools in the parish

This page will provide information regarding Schools in the Parish of St Brendan's

Back to Parish Information


Chanel College

Picture of Chanel Collete
Chanel College
Conducted by the Marist Fathers
50th Anniversary
1955 - 2005
Logo of Chanel Collete
Coolock Village
Malahide Road
Dublin 5
Telephone number: 01-8480655
Fax number: 01-8486330
Email: chaneloffice@eircom.net
website: www.chanelcollegeonline.com

Chanel College was founded in 1955. It is a Catholic Secondary School under the trusteeship of the Marist Fathers.

Our mission in Chanel College is to enable our students to reach their full potential so that they will make a positive difference in today's world. We strive to create a sense of community within the school and an informal but respectful atmosphere between students and staff members. In this pastoral environment, students are encouraged to take responsibility for themselves and for their learning.

St. Peter Chanel (1803 - 1841)

Chanel College is named after St. Peter Chanel who was born near Lyons, France on 12th July 1803. As a child, Peter Chanel found learning difficult and preferred to help his father on the farm. However, he eventually completed his education and decided to become a priest. He was ordained in 1827.

Two ideals dominated Fr. Chanel's life: a deep devotion to Mary, the mother of God and a desire to become a missionary. He worried about his capability, as he was rarely successful in any job he was given to do. When he worked as a teacher, for example, he found it difficult to keep order in class and he was often criticised for being too weak.

Fr. Peter Chanel volunteered to join the first group of eight Marist missionaries to the Pacific islands. The little group set sail from Le Havre, France on Christmas Eve 1836, knowing that they would probably never see their families and homeland again. Fr. Chanel's best friend since childhood, Fr. Claude Bret, died during the perilous sea journey and was buried at sea. Finally, after almost a year of travelling, Fr. Chanel and Brother Marie Nizier-Delorme arrived on the small Pacific island of Futuna. The local people, about nine hundred in all, were engaged in constant fighting. The missionaries found it very difficult to communicate with them as they did not speak their native language. Futuna's chief, Niuliki was friendly sometimes but more often he was hostile. He feared losing his hold over the people if they accepted the new religion.

Fr. Chanel worked hard, enduring poor living conditions, hunger and intense heat without protest. His patience and kindness impressed the people and they began to call him "the man with the good heart". His success as a missionary was limited, however. After four years, he had only managed to convert about forty people to Christianity. The climax came in 1841 when the chief's eldest son, Meitala turned to Fr. Chanel for advice. Rumours began to spread that Meitala had asked to become a Christian. The chief was outraged and gave permission for the missionaries to be put to death. On the morning of 28th April 1841, Fr. Chanel was alone in his hut when a fierce-looking group of men arrived, dressed as warriors. They clubbed and hacked him to death.

Peter Chanel's life and death as a Marist priest could be described as "the triumph of failure". Within months of his death, the people of Futuna begged for another priest to be sent to them. Two Marist priests replaced Fr.Chanel and with the help of Brother Nizier set about converting the island. Within three years, all the islanders had requested baptism.

On 12th June 1954 (the Marion Year), Fr. Peter Chanel, the first martyr of Oceania, was canonised by Pope Pius XII.

The goal of education is to get people to believe in their lives. Our mission in Chanel College is to enable students realise their potential in order to make a difference in today's world.

The Marist Order was founded in 1836. Chanel College began in 1955 and celebrates it's 50th anniversary in 2005. It is a Catholic boys school, under the trusteeship of the Marist Fathers. It strives to create a sense of community within school and respectful, informal atmosphere between pupils and teachers. In this pastoral environment pupils are encouraged to take responsibility for their learning and for their personal lives.


Mercy College

Picture of Mercy College
Telephone 000353-01-8480888/01-8480290
FAX 00353-01-8480163
St. Brendan's Drive,
Malahide Rd.,
Dublin 5
Electronic mail info@mercycoolock.ie
website: http://www.mercycoolock.ie

Mercy College was established in 1963 by the Mercy order. Over the years Mercy has provided an excellent education for girls from many parts of North Dublin. The overall educational philosophy of Mercy College is the full human development of the student. We strive to develop confident, articulate and caring young women. We pride ourselves on the results and achievements of our students. In recent years pupils have gone on to study Medicine, Engineering, Nursing, Law, Primary and Secondary Teaching, Accounting Science, Arts and a range of other disciplines.

We have especially close links with Dublin City University through the North Dublin Access Program. However, we are equally proud of our strong pastoral care system and the sense of self-esteem developed in all the girls. Students and parents also get the benefit of our highly successful Home School Liaison scheme and parents can participate in a range of adult education classes. We foster a sense of care for others by involving students in community and charitable projects. Students of TY and LCVP get a taste of the working world and a chance to develop their entrepreneurial skills. In all, we strive to provide students with a happy and healthy experience in secondary school, one where each girl will fulfill her true potential.


Scoil Chaitriona

Picture of Scoil Chaitriona
Scoil Chaitriona Infants,
Measc Ave.,
Coolock,
Dublin 5.
Tel: 8480142 Fax: 8674131
e-mail: naiscoil@eircom.net
website: http://www.scoilchaitriona.com

Scoil Chaitriona Infants is under the patronage of the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin and is conducted in accordance with the religious and educational philosophy of the Sisters of Mercy. The school caters for girls and boys from Junior Infants to First Class. There is a Special Needs Class for children who are diagnosed with mild general learning disability.

The curriculum is that which is laid down by the Department of Education and Science and comprises of English, Irish, Maths, Music, Physical Education; Social, Personal and Health Education; Social, Environmental and Scientific Education and Drama. Religious Education is also taught in the school.

Facilities at the school include Computer Room, Art Room, P.E. Hall and Library.

A meeting for the parents of new applicants is held each year in May and further details are available in the school's information booklet.

The Sisters of Mercy, founded by Catherine McAuley, came to teach in Coolock / Artane in 1955. The Mercy Order had acquired Coolock House, the former house of their foundress. They used the house as a school while Scoil Chatriona as we know it now, was being built. This was an historic moment for the sisters. They were in fact returning to their roots, the house where the dream of Mercy was born. Many fine sisters have come and gone over the years. they answered the need in the spirit of Catherine McAuley. When the Primary School had got under way and was well established in the new building the sisters saw the need to a Secondary School. Once again part of Coolock House, where the sisters were now living, was used to set up Mercy College or Virgo Clemens as it was then known. Finally the new building was completed and another dream became a reality!

The sisters continue to be involved in Coolock through education, visitation and the running of Mercy Centre (basement of Coolock House!) in the spirit of Catherine McAuley.